Author Archives: deweyreader

Compelling stories of discovery and destruction

551.46, The Power of the Sea: Tsunamis, Storm Surges, Rogue Waves, and Our Quest to Predict Disasters, by Bruce Parker (2010) The power of the sea, indeed!  This book, written by a prominent oceanographer, is about the history of humanity’s … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

At home in the 720s

When I started browsing the 720s, I found that I’d already read a bunch of the books in this decade.  Then, when I looked more closely, I realized that almost everything I’d read was in a single digit: the 728s … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

A rambling and very pleasant adventure

977 The Living Great Lakes: Searching for the Heart of the Inland Seas, by Jerry Dennis (2003). As a child, I loved the north shore of Lake Superior.  Driving north to go canoeing in the Boundary Waters with my dad, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Spook

129 Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife, by Mary Roach (2005). Mary Roach is one quirky writer.  I read her book Stiff: The Curious Life of Human Cadavers, a few years back and found it fascinating, irreverent, and just plain weird– … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Everyone’s struggle?

155.444 One and the Same: My Life as an Identical Twin and What I’ve Learned About Everyone’s Struggle to Be Singular, by Abigail Pogrebin (2009). I’m a twin.  When I was growing up, that fact sometimes made me feel different, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Watery 970s

Given a wide choice of local, regional, and national history, I seem to have been drawn to books on water.  (Maybe it’s time for a camping trip?) My choices: 971.315 A Respectable Ditch: A History of the Trent-Severn Waterway, 1833-1920, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The big picture in the 550s

I am usually drawn to the particular, the specific details that make a person or place or thing unique, and therefore interesting.  Still, these are all big-picture books– the major forces of the sea, the sweeping changes of global temperature … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment